untitled playlist

All my work is based on the assumption that I am not different from the rest of mankind. Therefore if there’s something in music that moves me, there’s a good chance that plenty of other people will experience the same.

Esa-Pekka Salonen

dcpast:


January, 1935. “[Aerial view of U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C.]” Harris & Ewing Collection, Library of Congress.

dcpast:

January, 1935. “[Aerial view of U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C.]” Harris & Ewing Collection, Library of Congress.

That seemingly innocuous phrase—”substantial evidence”—contained a huge break for drug companies. Lawmakers had considered a different standard—the preponderance of evidence. The difference, as one senator put it, was that to require only substantial proof meant that a drug could be deemed effective “even though there may be preponderant evidence to the contrary based upon equally reliable studies.” Especially after the FDA determined that two independent trials with statistically significant results in favor of the drug constituted substantial evidence, this meant that a drug up for approval could have as many do-overs as a drug company wanted to pay for. So long as the research eventually yielded evidence of efficacy, the failures would remain off the books. This is why antidepressants have been approved even though so many studies have shown them to be ineffective.
A lot of people really think a constitution written hundreds of years ago provides written guidance to any issue the nation might be faced with. Then again, a large subset of the same group believes that a book written 2000 years ago provides answers to all problems in life.
dcpast:

ca. 1902. “The Capitol at Washington.” Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942, photographer. Detroit Publishing Company Photograph Collection, Library of Congress.

dcpast:

ca. 1902. “The Capitol at Washington.” Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942, photographer. Detroit Publishing Company Photograph Collection, Library of Congress.

Mobile UI Aesthetics

It’s interesting to me that I left functionality out of my first app because custom coding it to look they way I wanted would have been too much for me at the time.

What I originally wanted to do (variable number of intervals) made it into the rewrite not because I had enough time and talent to do it (though at this point I probably could), but because the new iOS 7 aesthetic is in line with what I wanted to create a year ago. This time I could create the interface I wanted using the built in tools, mostly, instead of creating an entire custom UI from scratch.

From an email I got:

There’s a lot of it about at this time of the year in the northern hemisphere. Just about everyone I speak to has a cold, cough or both, and although I hoped I might skate unscathed through the winter months, right now I too have my fair share of the sniffles. I wouldn’t get too close to your computer screen if I were you.

But here’s the thing. I find it intriguing that people often take different linguistic approaches to describing their physical and mental health problems.

With a physical illness they’re likely to explain ‘I have a cold’ or ‘I’ve got the flu’. However, when it comes to a mood problem, some may be inclined to say ‘I am depressed’ or ‘I’m anxious’.

It would sound absurd to say ‘I am a cold’ or ‘I am the flu’, yet it’s all too easy to turn a mental health problem into something which seems to define us, rather than a problem that is hopefully time-limited.

Although it sounds a little awkward, surely it’s better to regard depression or anxiety as things we have, rather than things we are?

'I am depressed' sounds pretty long-term to me, whereas 'I have depression' feels a more temporary condition - even if it doesn't roll off the tongue quite so easily as the 'I am' version.

Why should it matter, though? What difference does our choice of words make?

Well actually I think it’s probably pretty important. If I tell someone that I’m depressed, it seems to pigeon-hole me. And of course I hear myself saying the words when I speak them out loud. It can feel as though I’ve become the condition, whereas what I’d very much hope is that it’s a somewhat temporary state of mind.

Whether or not you buy into the entire concept of neuro-linguistic programming (NLP), it’s fairly certain that we do listen to the stuff we tell ourselves: so it wouldn’t be surprising if a steady diet of negative thinking led you to feel crabby, while a rather more positive approach resulted in a happier outcome.

So next time you’re going through a rough patch, there may be sense in regarding it as something that’s happening to you rather than something that you are.

'I'm a runny nose' sounds rather ridiculous, just as 'I'm depressed' should, too.

(via Instagram)

(via Instagram)

Best. Valentine’s Day. Card. Ever.
EVER.

Best. Valentine’s Day. Card. Ever.

EVER.

On The Other Side

I hate them all
I hate them all
I hate myself for hating them
So I’ll drink some more
I love them all!
I’ll drink even more
I’ll hate them even more than I did before